Book Review: ‘She Hunts In The Woods: A Horror Story’ by Rich Hawkins

This is a good short story for October and Halloween reading. What starts as a sinister and tense story develops into a tale of fear and flight before growing darker and more horrific. 

The tension and sense of dread grow steadily, making both the main character and the reader increasingly uncomfortable before the true horror of the forest is revealed. The author combines elements of foreboding, macabre, revulsion and fear to influence the reader’s feelings and reactions. 

Even though the title gives away the fact that there’s something lurking in the woods, this story is quite original and well written.

There is some adult content, so it’s not recommended for kids.

Book Review: ‘Dobson Drive’ by Dale Robertson

Fear is often irrational… but sometimes, it’s not.  This is a good, suspenseful short story about one of those times when someone would have been right to pay heed to their fears. 

The story works really well because the characters and setting are so normal and relatable, which reminds the reader that this scenario could just as easily happen to them. 

The writing is good and the development of suspense and foreboding in the story is gradual and well-managed. 

‘Dobson Drive is a good story that can be read in about half an hour. It is ideally suited for readers of horror, paranormal and suspense. 

Book Review: ‘Roger’s Revelation: : An Emma: Ancestor’s Tales Vignette ‘ by Paula Shablo

This is a quite a wistful and quirky read on one hand, yet quite dark and confronting on the other.

A deep sense of irony pervades the story and  highlights the tragedy of the backstory which Roger reveals to Emma when she meets him at their old school. It is certainly thought-provoking about what comes after death and the likelihood that the spirit world could exist right alongside, or even intersect with, our own.

The raw reality of suicide and the jolting power of grief and survivor’s guilt are treated with sensitivity and empathy, and the story cleverly positions the reader to understand the perspectives of both Roger and Emma, and other people known to them both, as they share their experiences. 

This story may be personally challenging to those who have lost friends or loved ones to suicide, but it may also offer some reassurance and objectivity through the different perspectives of the characters.

It is a testament to the skill of the author that the story is very well balanced and poignant, given its serious and sombre themes. 

Book Review: ‘Last Call’ by Kaye Lynne Booth

This is an interesting and well-written story that can be read in under 30 minutes, making it ideal for busy people wanting a quick escape. The story neatly combines elements of mystery and suspense with a thought-provoking twist. 

The main character is relatable, as is his situation he finds himself. Empathy is induced by the first person narration and the exploration of his thoughts and responses, especially when he begins to question his own perceptions. When life offers him a refreshing change, the reader is challenged to consider what they would do in the same circumstances, giving them a vested interest in the outcome of the story. 

‘Last Call’ is a most enjoyable short story. 

Book Review: ‘Little Book of Spring’ by Claire Buss

A relatable, easy to read poetry collection.

This book offers vignettes of daily life and glimpses into the thoughts of a young woman. Her children, family life, personal feelings and places they visit all feature in this collection of poetry. 

Some of the poems carry a kernel of a deeper truth that provoked more thought, while others skip through a scene, describing it in a way that leaves the reader nodding and smiling. In every case, it is easy to relate to the ideas expressed by the poet. 

Book Review: ‘Once Upon An Ending: Seven Short Stories, Each With A Twist In The Tale’ by Jonathan Posner

This is an enjoyable collection of seven mixed genre short stories. 
Some of these stories are more complex than others, offering some intrigue and good plot development before delivering a twist. One or two of the others were less involved and, while they certainly delivered a twist, it was more of a surprise ending than the fulfilment of a sense of mystery. 

The retro narrative style of the three ‘Private Eyes’ stories which comprise a detective noir style series gave them a nice mystery aesthetic that worked quite well. A profound contrast is provided by the dark humour and bleak irony of ‘Halloween in Windsor. 

These stories are most likely to appeal to readers with varied and eclectic tastes and an appreciation for clever and unpredictable storytelling. 

Book Review: ‘The Bet’ by K.A. Denver

This is a short but darkly creepy and suspenseful story. The premise is relatable, and the characters and their responses are realistic and engaging. 

The macabre and horror story elements were well crafted, aided by the setting and context of the story. 

If you are looking for an enjoyable story that will both fill and darken your lunch break, this is it.