Book Review: 'My Dream Woman' by C.H. Clepitt

While many people may insist that they wish their dreams really would come true, this story reminds the reader that it might not always be a good thing. ‘My Dream Woman’ is a heartwarming, entertaining and quite fantastic tale of the power of dreams in the lives and destinies of those who have them. 

The author has created a quite brilliant concept with the Guild of Dream Warriors and in doing so has opened up a whole new realm of potential for contemporary fantasy— one which the author has deftly and confidently made her own with the mystical and mysterious collection of characters who populate this story. Of course, nothing is perfect, and therein lies the complication that sets the plot of this delightful tale in motion. 

The story is written in a familiar and relaxed tone that makes the reader feel as if they have known Andi, the central character, for much longer than just the time they’ve been reading. The story rolls on at a good pace, at some times lighthearted and amusing, and at other times suspenseful and intriguing, but always delivering twists that keep both the reader and the characters curious and engaged. 

Once again, Cleiptt has produced a highly original and quirky story that has far more depth and meaning to it than just mere entertainment. As the assumptions, fears and instincts of the characters are explored, so are those of the reader, revealing truths that challenge the way in which one understands their own responses to life and the different people with whom we share it. 

There is some adult content, so it’s not a book for younger readers, but it is a positive and empowering read that promotes understanding of different perspectives and orientations. 

Having found so much to enjoy in this novella, it is very exciting to know there are two more books in the Guild of Dream Warriors series. 

Book Review: ‘Another Girl Calls My Dad Daddy’ by Emma L Price

Find your copy here.

If there’s anything young readers will find relatable, it’s sibling jealousy and rivalry— especially in blended families. The author has done a great job of creating a realistic and complex family situation in which two girls must each learn to share their father and fully accept one another.

Readers will find Portia both likeable and understandable, and while not all of her responses are ideal, they will se her as a young person who is doing her best to adjust to new challenges and trials. Her challenges in getting to know the real Jasmine are clearly and empathetically portrayed through her thoughts and actions, just as Jasmine’s feeelings are communicated through her behaviours. 

Although both girls find the changes they have to make confronting and awkward, this is a positive and encouraging story that is sure to help young readers understand these kinds of situations from someone else’s point of view. 

This book is probably best suited for preteen and early teen readers, but it is enjoyable enough for older audiences too.  It would certainly be a good choice for families to read together, and a highly appropriate addition to local and school libraries. 

Book Review: ‘Books, Blogs and Bloody Murder’ by Michelle Ann Hollstein

Find your copy here.

This is a fun short cozy mystery story featuring Aggie Underhill, an amateur sleuth. The story revolves around a woman’s sudden death in a local bookstore.

Aggie is delightful, and each of her friends adds colour and vitality to the story. 

While this particular story is more about Aggie’s situation than sleuthing or solving crime, it is an engaging and entertaining light read that serves as a good introduction to the series.

Book Review: ‘The Marquesa’s Necklace’ by P.J. MacLayne

Find your copy here.

What a treat it is to find a mystery that is interesting, unpredictable and highly original. 

The writing is good, the characters and scenarios are believable, and there are plenty of suspects and reflection herrings to sort through. 

As the central character, Harmony Dupree is refreshing in her normality and average appearance, using her brains and ingenuity to solve her problems and find solutions to the challenges she encounters. 

This is an interesting and engaging story that, once started, is hard to put down and really keeps the reader guessing.

Book Review: ‘Fallen Captive’ by Aliya DalRae

The second novel in DalRae’s Fallen Cross Legion Series is an excellent blend of paranormal romance, tragedy and thriller. 

‘Fallen Captive’ explores the backstory of Nox and his experiences before coming to Fallen Cross, providing both compelling reading and a powerful contrast to the future Nox has begun to build for himself. All of this takes place in the context of the development of the narrative of the Fallen Cross Legion and the stories of its individual members. 

The end result is a complex and well-crafted story that immerses the reader in the world of these Vampires and causes them to invest deeply in the survival and the futures of the central characters.

Book Review: ‘Bentwhistle the Dragon – A Threat From The Past’ by Paul Cude

Find your copy here.

The first in the Bentwhistle the Dragon series of urban fantasy novels, this book is a wonderful blend of fantasy, mystery, adventure and suspense thriller. Dragons and magic abound in a parallel world that is complex and fascinating, and which remains full of surprises even for those who live there. 

Suitable for young adult and older audiences, the story explores important themes of friendship, ethics and personal integrity through the experiences of Peter Bentwhistle and his best friends, Richie and Tank. 

The characters are delightful, each with quirks and qualities that make them both likeable and relatable for human and dragon readers alike. The more sinister characters are similarly relatable, because we all know someone who is selfish or a bully. As the action rolls and the story develops, the reader is drawn deeper into the story and finds themselves very definitely on the side of the protagonists. The twists and surprises keep coming, right to the end of the book. 

Well-written and expertly constructed, this is a brilliant read.

Book Review: 'Red Dot Capers' by C.A. King

Find your copy here.

What do you get when you cross a shifter in denial and a reclusive cat lady with anger issues? 

You get a highly entertaining paranormal mystery adventure story that doesn’t want to be put down once you pick it up. 

This is a great read, written with warmth and vivacity. Just like the storyline, the characters are quite original and quirky. The writing is very good and the action moves at a good pace, with a few amusing twists along the way.