Book of the Week: Source of Power: The Complete Trilogy by Tony Lindblom

The Source of Power trilogy is a fast-paced Space Opera with elements of Epic Fantasy, following both heroes and villains through a universe where the line between magic and technology is blurred.

The planet Entori

In the Free Kingdoms on the planet Entori, the royals are desperate to defend themselves and their kingdoms against the aggressive Taran Empire. The Free Kingdoms would not stand a chance if the Tarans would launch a full attack, unless they can find the legendary city of Anzoria, which is said to contain a weapon of immense power.

Milky Way galaxy

In the milky way galaxy, the ruthless corporation Aterion Industries and their plans for domination are only held back by the Intergalactic Trade Council. The council was formed as an alliance between multiple governments and authorities to keep companies like Aterion Industries from gaining too much power, and they have succeeded at keeping them in check for some time. But when a previously unknown alien race starts attacking the human worlds; Aterion might be the only ones with a military power strong enough to counter the alien threat.

The books in the trilogy are also available individually.

The trilogy’s homepage features some excellent concept art and additional background information to the series.

Note: Because the series does include some sensitive content, the Source of Power trilogy is intended for new adult and adult audiences.

Read a review on Amazon or Goodreads.

Book Review: ‘Andorra Pett and the Oort Cloud Cafe’ by Richard Dee

Andorra and her best friend Cy are fabulous as the lead characters in this entertaining science fiction mystery story that takes place on a space station operating on the rings of Saturn. 

Dee writes with a natural and relaxed style, infused with humour and observant  insight into human behaviour and responses. 

The story itself is well-crafted, immersing the reader in the station’s community and keeping them guessing with well-executed twists and clever diversions woven seamlessly into the plot. 

The world building is original and complex, opening the reader’s imagination to the vast possibilities of life beyond our own world.

The cast of characters and their individual personalities, quirks and motivations remind the reader that people are the same wherever you go, which is why the premise and assumptions of the story work so well. 

This is a most enjoyable read that will appeal to lovers of sci-fi and murder mysteries alike.

Book Review: ‘My Dream Woman’ by C.H. Clepitt

While many people may insist that they wish their dreams really would come true, this story reminds the reader that it might not always be a good thing. ‘My Dream Woman’ is a heartwarming, entertaining and quite fantastic tale of the power of dreams in the lives and destinies of those who have them. 

The author has created a quite brilliant concept with the Guild of Dream Warriors and in doing so has opened up a whole new realm of potential for contemporary fantasy— one which the author has deftly and confidently made her own with the mystical and mysterious collection of characters who populate this story. Of course, nothing is perfect, and therein lies the complication that sets the plot of this delightful tale in motion. 

The story is written in a familiar and relaxed tone that makes the reader feel as if they have known Andi, the central character, for much longer than just the time they’ve been reading. The story rolls on at a good pace, at some times lighthearted and amusing, and at other times suspenseful and intriguing, but always delivering twists that keep both the reader and the characters curious and engaged. 

Once again, Cleiptt has produced a highly original and quirky story that has far more depth and meaning to it than just mere entertainment. As the assumptions, fears and instincts of the characters are explored, so are those of the reader, revealing truths that challenge the way in which one understands their own responses to life and the different people with whom we share it. 

There is some adult content, so it’s not a book for younger readers, but it is a positive and empowering read that promotes understanding of different perspectives and orientations. 

Having found so much to enjoy in this novella, it is very exciting to know there are two more books in the Guild of Dream Warriors series. 

Book Review: ‘The Guilty Path : Versatile Layer Book 5’ by Thomas K Davis

The fifth book in the Versatile Layer science fiction series, this book has some great qualities. The story is interesting and exciting, with moments of intense action balanced by humour and character development to give the reader a feeling of being on the same side as the protagonist, the warrior Adeola. There are characters who are likeable, and others who are less so. Most intriguing, though, are those whose status as ally or antagonist remains unclear as the story progresses, maintaining the mystery of the story and it’s outcomes right to the end.

Sadly, though, the book doesn’t live up to its potential because it really needs editing. There are too many basic errors that compromise the quality of the writing and cause frequent and unnecessary frustration for readers. The author clearly knows how to write well, so this seems to be an issue of poor quality control that would easily be overcome with thorough proofreading and correction.

Book Review: ‘Fight Like A Woman’ by J.S. Frankel

A story of resistance, resilience and loyalty, this is a book for the persecuted, the exploited and the downtrodden. It is a story in which brains overcome brawn and integrity is valued more than power.

Kyle Sorton is a classic underdog character, highly relatable for anyone who has struggled with mediocrity or a lack of opportunities to discover their potential. The tenacity and self-assurance of Rinarra and Merat make them powerful contrasts for Kyle, yet he surprises himself by proving to be their equal in resourcefulness and instinct. That the three of them overcome their challenges by working together and sharing their knowledge and abilities is a powerful reminder that we are stronger together than alone, and that a loyal team can achieve far more in cooperation than they could if the members were to work independently of one another..

The plot is intriguing and highly engaging, and the world building is excellent. There is enough that is familiar to the reader for them to feel sufficiently oriented and grounded, but enough that is different for them to be fascinated by the qualities of the world and culture in which they are immersed.

The unique circumstances in which Kyle finds himself are treated with sensitivity and a sense of natural curiosity, making him a central character who will endear himself to those readers who have questioned and explored their own questions of self, gender and identity, even though Kyle’s situation and the reasons for his questioning are bound to be somewhat different than their own.

This is a most excellent read.

Book Review: ‘The River Of Time’ Shiva XIV Book 4 by Lyra Shanti

‘The River of Time’ is book 4 in Lyra Shanti’s magnificent Shiva XIV space opera novel series.

In this instalment, there is plenty of intrigue, suspense, action and epic battle as Ayn and his comrades work agaisnt the evil power that threatens to destroy not only individuals, but also the universe as they know it. 

It is also, however, the most intensely mystical of the series, exploring themes of friendship and loyalty, the nature of the power at the centre of the universe, and redemption and reincarnation.  It is in the context of these themes that Ayn and Axis each question their identity and experience, and their roles in both the history and the future of the worlds they inhabit. 

Through their existential quests, the reader too is reminded that each of us has a role to play, services and gifts to offer, and dreams to pursue, which can contribute to either the destruction or the redemption of our world. The choices we make are crucial, and their impacts and implications extend far beyond our own individual lives. Thus, like Ayn and Axis, Pei and Meddhi, and all the other much-loved characters from this series, we all navigate the River of Time.

This is a universal story and a deeply personal story at the same time, one which confronts and challenges while also entertaining and inspiring the reader. 

Book Review: ‘The Glass Runner: Versatile Layer Book 2’ by Thomas Davis

‘The Glass Runner’ is a science fiction book with a decent storyline, interesting characters, and some good action sequences. Moments of humour break the tension of battle and conflict, and an air of mystery surrounding some of the characters adds an element of intrigue. 

The central characters are varied and interesting, with personalities and qualities that make them likeable and engaging.  While recounting the conflict between the Terrans and the Arez, the story provides a coming-of-age for Chase as he fights to overcome those who not only threaten the future, but also plague his past. 

This book is, however, rather in need of a good edit. Correcting the too-frequent errors and polishing the storytelling would raise the overall finished quality of the book and make it more appealing and satisfying to readers. 

‘The Glass Runner: Versatile Layer Book 2’ has been awarded a Bronze Acorn. 

Find your copy here.