Book Review: ‘The Gravedigger’s Tales’ by Kaye St Clair

This is a collection of poems and short stories In the style of folk tales and fables, with darker themes and motifs that make them ideally suited for October reading. 

The stories are quite well-written, although not particularly complex or deep. Each set of related stories is introduced by a poem that introduces the key idea that connects the poem and subsequent stories to each other. 

This book was an entertaining enough read to be a pleasant diversion at the end of a busy day, but would probably not satisfy one’s desire for a deeper, more compelling story or a truly horrifying read.

Book Review: ‘So Absurd It Must Be True’ by Victoria Ray

I have read plenty of stories that confused me before, but this book took me to another level of bewilderment. 

Without a doubt, this is the strangest collection of stories I have ever read. There are some really creative ideas, but those are frustrated by too many nonsense moments, too many absurdities and not enough development in the stories to make the ideas really work effectively. 

To be honest, the burb promised ‘absurd’ and ‘bizarre’ and it certainly delivered that. I should have taken it more literally than I did. 

Book Review: ‘Once Upon An Ending: Seven Short Stories, Each With A Twist In The Tale’ by Jonathan Posner

This is an enjoyable collection of seven mixed genre short stories. 
Some of these stories are more complex than others, offering some intrigue and good plot development before delivering a twist. One or two of the others were less involved and, while they certainly delivered a twist, it was more of a surprise ending than the fulfilment of a sense of mystery. 

The retro narrative style of the three ‘Private Eyes’ stories which comprise a detective noir style series gave them a nice mystery aesthetic that worked quite well. A profound contrast is provided by the dark humour and bleak irony of ‘Halloween in Windsor. 

These stories are most likely to appeal to readers with varied and eclectic tastes and an appreciation for clever and unpredictable storytelling. 

Book Review: ‘Not Your Abuelita’s Folktales’ by Maria J Estrada

This book contains four unique young adult short stories that are full of the colours and textures of Southwestern America.  

These are very entertaining and interesting stories, populated by a variety of diverse characters who all face various challenges common to youth, from issues of cultural acceptance to boys manipulating girls to get what they want. The challenges faced by the characters are often complicated by differences of culture or understanding that set them apart from those around them. 

All four stories have quite thought-provoking elements that pique the reader’s curiosity and invite them to engage in the story at a deeper level. By making the reader intimately familiar with each main characters’ thoughts and responses, the author cleverly immerses the reader in each story and leads them to feel as though they are watching over the characters’ shoulders as a silent eyewitness to the events that unfold. 

Magical realism and paranormal elements create additional layers of mystery and intrigue within each narrative. Because some of the protagonists are not human, the stories are highly original and their outcomes are not predictable. 

This is a most enjoyable and diverting book with a fresh perspective on YA literature. 

New Release: ‘Pussycats Galore’ by Stephanie Barr

Cats.Fluffy, soft, and cuddly. Keepers of the amazing purr. Vicious, deadly killing machines… that choose to share their lives with us.

Science fiction kitties saving lives. Cat shifters. Vampire kitties. Ghost kitties. Zombie kittes. Even angel kitties. Every shape and size of cats, but each with their incredible catness and dual personalities intact. There’s a kitty for everyone here.

Twenty stories celebrating the mystery, magic and mayhem of cats by someone who loves them like you do.

Pussycats Galore is now available for your reading pleasure.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Sylvermoon Chronicles VII’ by the Confederacy of the Quill

This anthology – the seventh in the Sylvermoon Chronicles series – is an outstanding collection of science fiction, fantasy and  horror short stories by authors who are most accomplished at their craft. 

The stories range from angels to demons and wraiths, futuristic worlds to fantasy lands, and scenes laden with terror to deep inner conflicts and fears. Each one is powerfully written, able to immerse the reader in a situation that demands and consumes their attention from the outset.  

The stories are, without exception, quite excellent. 

The diversity and variety between the stories ensure that the reader is always engaged and interested, While there were definitely stories that I enjoyed more than others, that is purely a matter of personal preference.

Sylvermoon Chronicles VII has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

Find your copy here

Book Review: ‘A Sprig Of Holly’ by J.A. Clement

A delightful tale full of winter magic.

This is a delightful tale full of winter magic with well developed fairy tale qualities that enrich the story telling.

While the characters are not very complex, they are likeable and engaging, and the reader does develop a sense of empathy and concern for them at the beginning of the story that helps to hook them into the events of the tale.  Of course, it is a short story, so the characters are not required to be developed in any depth or detail. It is enough that they do what they do and that the story is beautifully told.

The story also has some lovely Yuletide elements, although not so much that it is only a story for the Christmas season. 

This would be a lovely story for family reading, particularly on a winter’s night. 

‘A Sprig Of Holly’ has been awarded a Silver Acorn. 

Find your copy here

There are more stories in this series, which I’m keen to read!