Book Review: ‘Out of the Shadows’ by Dana Fraedrich

I have incredibly strong, yet mixed, feelings about this book. 

The story is excellent and very well told. Tthe characters are wonderful, and the world building is great. The central character is vivacious and intelligent, and her position as someone who is highly individual in a world where conformity is prized is highly relatable for many in this day and age. Through the characters and events of the story, the reader is challenged to consider the complexities of life, loyalty, overcoming prejudice and being true to ones own identity and values. 

There is nothing not to love about this book, except the ending. There is no resolution to the questions and complications of the story. It’s not a well-executed cliffhanger. 

It .
Just.
Stops. 

To be reading a brilliant story and then just have it stop dead in its tracks is most disappointing, to say the least.  It’s fair to say that my disappointment at the end of the book overwhelmed and outweighed all the enjoyment I had derived from it, and left me feeling quite resentful and angry. 

It was clearly designed for readers to progress straight to the next book, as one sometimes does with a series, and if readers chose to do so, then the nature of the ending probably doesn’t matter so much. The story is certainly interesting and engaging enough that readers might want to do that. 

The problem is that many readers don’t read a series sequentially like that. I prefer to vary my reading across genres and styles, and I know I am not by any means the only one who does so. 

When I buy a book, it’s with the understanding that I’m going to get a complete story with some closure and a proper ending. It’s actually enough to put me off buying the next book, even though I really want to know what happens, simply because I  believe the same thing will happen again. 

If you are a reader who is willing to move straight into the sequel, then by all means consider this to be a Gold Acorn review. Read this book and make sure you’ve got the next one ready to go at the end of it.

If you are a reader who will be frustrated by the absence of any decent ending or resolution, then no matter how good the story is, this is not the book for you. 

There have been one or two occasions on which I have contemplated creating a Black Acorn. Today, I have actually done it.

Related post: Well, That Ended Badly…

Book Review: ‘Pretty Waiter Girls’ by Greg Alldredge

An excellent steampunk fantasy mystery novel, ‘Pretty Waiter Girls’ is a captivating story set in San Francisco, 1899, where mystery, magic, science, inventions, petty crime and serial murderers exist uneasily alongside one another. 

Helena Brandywine is a charming heroine – young, feisty, smart, good-natured, and keen to rescue others from danger. While she aspires to become like Sherlock Holmes, Helena is more empathetic and less aloof than her hero. The detective, Doyle, and Helena’s companions and employees Sigmund and Lane are all effective foils for her youth and impulsiveness.  As they investigate the disappearance of a young socialite and the death of another young woman from very different circumstances, each of the central characters turns out to be as complex and challenging as the mysteries they seek to solve.  This sets up a dynamic between them that is both enjoyable and fascinating.

The narrative is interesting and exciting, and very well constructed. The story is as full of action and adventure as it is of mystery and intrigue. The writing has a positive, adventurous tone that really suits the genre and style of the story and keeps the reader hooked on the action of the story as the mysteries and challenges that face Helena unfold. The mysteries are well constructed, made more fascinating by their relation to questions relating to Helena’s family, and by their apparent connections to the shadowy beings that frequent the city in the dark. 

A most enjoyable read, ‘Pretty Waiter Girls’ has been awarded a Gold Acorn. 

Find your copy here

Author Interview: Gregory Tasoulas

Today I’m chatting with author Gregory Tasoulas about his short story called Elmwean’s Lodge. Welcome, Gregory!

Thank you, Book Squirrel!

Why don’t you start by giving us a rundown of the story?

It’s the first in a series of novelettes set in an original teslapunk world.

Professor Incabad Reyl is the greatest scientist of his time. His equation of echomagnetic fractions marked the beginning of a new era of technological advancement for the Horizon.
In 104 H.S., 30 years after his groundbreaking discovery, he sets off on an adventurous search, in order to uncover the laws that govern the dynamics between the twelve electrons of his fractional echomagnetic dynamics theory.
On the way to this Master Equation, Professor Reyl will stumble upon hidden truths that will change the way humanity perceives existence.

That sounds really interesting. What inspired you to write?

I like stories. Listening to stories, seeing them on film, hearing about them, exploring them. Their reasoning, their logic, their purpose. And I like telling stories, creating fictional situations. For me it’s not about the process of writing, but rather conveying a story that is in my mind.

What are you working on writing now?

I am currently finishing the novella Return to Elmwean’s Lodge, which is the sequel to my first published short. I am also finishing up my research for the next one in the series, as well as a couple of standalone stories which are set in different eras of the Horizon and introduce new characters and places.

Do you have a favourite food or drink that helps you write?

No, but I do vape a lot when I write (my cats make it hard to safely eat or drink near the computer).

Who designs your book covers?

Mario Tsota, an amazing young illustrator who is also a very diligent and cooperative professional. He is currently studying fine arts at the University of Fine Arts in Thessaloniki, Greece. You can find his work on his website.

What’s your favourite kind of music?

Atmospheric instrumental has been my favorite for the past decade or so, but I also enjoy several gothic genres.

Forest, country, beach or city?

Why not a combination of the above? I enjoy the mingling. 

What is your pet hate? Have you ever built it into a character or used it in your writing?

Unsatisfying jobs. I’ve had a lot of them in my life and you will find a lot of my characters are plagued by this very real problem.

What’s your favourite TV show?

Babylon 5. 

What movie can you watch over and over again?

Big Trouble in Little China. You didn’t see that coming, did you?

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An astronaut. I know, cheesy.

What’s your favourite season? Why?

Autumn. I love the balance of temperature and weather, as well as the gearing up to Xmas 😀

And the nuts?

Haha, sure!

Who are your three greatest literary inspirations?

J.R.R. Tolkien, H.P. Lovecraft, Hesiod.

What’s your favourite quote, ever?

“That is not dead which can eternal lie, And with strange aeons even death may die.” H.P. Lovecraft

Name two things in life that you wish were easier.

Understanding women and waking up in the morning.

That’s where I’m lucky. Lady squirrels are very easy to understand.

Lucky indeed, my friend!

Where can readers follow you on social media?

I have a Website and I’m on Goodreads, Twitter and Facebook.

And where can readers find your book?

Elmwean’s Lodge is free to download in epub and pdf on our website and a few digital stores.

Thanks for being here today, Gregory! I wish you success!

Thank you, Book Squirrel!


Book Review: ‘Pratima’s Engines’ by S.A. Gibson

A very enjoyable Steampunk short read.

SA Gibson Pratimas EnginesPratima’s Engines is a short steampunk story of conflicted interests and opposing priorities set in post-Collapse India. It is an interesting and enjoyable story, although I would have liked to see the mystery and tension developed more before the story reached its climax.

The central character, Armeena, is very likeable and easily gains the reader’s sympathy as she discovers uncomfortable truths about her own situation. She provides a positive role model not only in her resilience, but also in her loyalty to her friends.

Acorn Award II SilverPratima’s Engines provided a pleasant and relaxing diversion in an otherwise busy day, and is well worth a read. I have awarded it a Silver Acorn.

Get your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Forever Boy’ by Lita Burke

‘Forever Boy’ is a delightful clockpunk short read.

Lita Burke Forever Boy
‘Forever Boy’ is a delightful clockpunk story of the difference made in one young life when kindness and generosity cause bad magic to be replaced with good.

Kadmeion and Bright are nicely developed magical characters who drive the narrative. Instantly likeable, they engage and involve the reader through their rescue and rehabilitation of a small dog who, like many things in the magical world, turns out to be so much more than what he initially seemed.

This is a great read to enjoy in less than an hour, making it ideal for bookworms with busy lives, or to fill in a lunch break.
Acorn Award II Silver

‘Forever Boy’ has been awarded a Silver Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Iago Wick and the Vampire Queen’ by Jennifer Rainey

‘Iago Wick and the Vampire Queen’ by Jennifer Rainey: Deliciously dark and twisted.

Jennifer Rainey Lovelace and Wick 0This book’s brilliant opening was just a taste of the vivid imagery and dark, ironic humour that characterises the writing. Before I had finished the first page, I knew I had found an author whose work I would truly appreciate.

This story is deliciously dark and twisted, full of varied and creatively crafted characters who each have their own motivations and desires that bring some surprising twists to the tale. The story moves at a very good pace, with lots of interesting plot and character developments.

The other aspect of this story that I really enjoy is that it delivers a wonderfully unique combination of steampunk, science fiction, historical fiction and paranormal elements.

There is absolutely zero chance of boredom while reading this book, and it is perfect for my subversive sense of humour. I definitely intend to read this entire series.

Acorn Award I Golden
‘Iago Wick and the Vampire Queen’ has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Out Of The Sands’ by S.A. Gibson and Safa Shaqsy

A fascinating steampunk adventure short story.

SA Gibson Safa Shaqsy Out Of The Sands‘Out Of The Sands’ is a fascinating steampunk adventure short story of political intrigue set in Egypt during a time of social reconstruction.

Aaleyah has been hired to survey the nation’s antiquities; Sunil is her engineer and balloonist. They are immediately very likeable and well-crafted characters, and develop more fully as the story progresses.

The plot unfolds at an exciting pace, with lots of action and movement to keep the reader engaged throughout. The steampunk elements are subtle and well-designed, adding elegance and depth to the story.

This is a very enjoyable and interesting read, finished comfortably in an hour, and includes libraries, history, and sword fighting. What more could a reader want in a story?
Acorn Award I Golden

‘Out Of The Sands’ has been awarded a Gold Acorn for excellence.

Get your copy here.