New Release: ‘The Shikari 3: The Order’ by Dora Blume

The Shikari is a fast-paced urban fantasy series that pitches good vs evil as the Shikari warriors fight to stop demons from taking control of America.

The Shikari 3: The Order’ is the newest book in the series.

In the world of the Shikari, all hell is breaking loose.Literally!

Demon’s have taken over the order.Every city is being overrun. 

But the gang is going in search of one of their own. Let someone else save the world for a change

Jessie’s mom is missing. In their search for her, they come across the device that can take away all Shikari powers. It slips through their fingers and the entire Shikari’s survival is at stake.
But Who can they trust?

Never figuring out who killed their mother, Sloane and Erik are out for answers. Their father’s don’t seem to be adding up and his cowardice is making them suspicious. They’re going to need their bonds and gifts more than ever.

How will they save Jessie’s mom, stop the demons from killing them all, and discover who’s behind their mother’s death while also keeping their relationships intact?

Life as a Shikari warrior is far too complicated some days. Hopefully, sooner rather than later, it won’t be.

If you love K.F. Breene and Lindsey Hall, you’ll love this fast-paced urban fantasy series.

Book Review: ‘Kin: Horror in Moonshine Holler’ by J.B.Richards

This is a short story read that takes the reader from Texas to the wilds of West Virginia and an old family’s quest for revenge. 

While the tale has a few well-crafted macabre moments, it’s not really a full-on horror story as such- although it’s fair to say that at least one of the characters might beg to differ. It is a story of tragedy and of loyalty that binds a family against anyone who hurts one of their own. It’s a story that makes the reader hold their breath without realising it, and which highlights the often unforeseen consequences of one’s actions. 

The story is well written, interesting, and suspenseful. The characters are colourful and unique, and fit very well into the context and setting of the book.

Audiobook Review: ‘Six of Crows’ by Leigh Bardugo

A stunning, tense and dark adventure that carries the reader from the streets of Ketterdam to the splendour of the Ice Court on the most dangerous mission Kaz Brekker and the Dregs had ever taken on. 

The writing is powerful and compelling, conveying the desperation and adrenaline of the story, and the imagery is rich in sensory detail.

Telling the story from the different characters’ perspectives create an intriguing dramatic irony that both informs the reader and helps to build the suspense and anticipation that completely  hooks the audience. 

The narrators – one for each central character – are expressive and very listenable, making the story flow and creating a very effective interweaving of the strands of the story. The characters really come to life with the audio, especially in the recounting of their backstories, the exposition of their thoughts and fears, and the revelation of their perceptions and responses to the other characters and the experiences they share. 

The story remains suspenseful and maintains the innate tension of the story right to the end. 

Book Review: ‘Dark Little Wonders and Other Stories’ by Amy Cross

A collection of well-crafted and varied short stories, ‘Dark Little Wonders’ definitely lives up to its title.

The stories are all quite different, invariably dark, and full of twists and surprises. Taken one by one, each story challenges the reader to see life – and death – from a different perspective. In combination, this collection of dark fiction reminds the reader that one can be haunted by many more things than just ghosts. 

The writing is very good and the characters are realistic, each having burdens, flaws, and motivations to which the reader can easily relate. This adds punch to every twist sand makes the message of each story more powerful. 

‘Dark Little Wonders and Other Stories’ is an excellent read. 

New Release: ‘When The Paint Dries’ by C.A. King

The Four Horsemen series by C.A. King is a paranormal suspense series that pitches good against evil in a ‘winner takes all’ struggle that culminates in ‘When The Paint Dries’, the fourth and final book in the series.

Meet the four horsemen: Michael, Gabrielle, Uriel and Raphael.

For centuries their sole purpose has been guarding the sealed gates to hell. Without keys, there was never any real threat. That was about to change…

Blond hair and leadership skills go hand in hand, at least for demigods. That sort of fame and glory, however, comes with a hefty price tag. Raphael is living proof of that. The straight and narrow is his destined path, and in all his years, he never once veered, allowing his personal life to fall by the wayside in the name of duty.

He isn’t buying into the madness his siblings are spewing about true love and the keys—in fact—he’s positive it’s all an elaborate scheme. Whoever is masquerading as Dante picked the wrong family to mess with and Raphael will do anything to prove it.

It’s winner takes all in this final instalment of the Four Horsemen Series. When the paint dries, someone has to come out on top, but can they live with themselves when they do?

Book Review: ‘Nowhere: A Shore Haven Short Story’ by Jennifer Reynolds

Find your copy here.

A zombie apocalypse story with some graphic macabre moments, ‘Nowhere’ is an emotionally involving story that pits the reader alongside the protagonist in a desperate bid to outrun the zombie epidemic. 

The tone of the story is urgent, drawing the reader into the panic and fear that Tera experiences as the story plays out. The author very effectively uses suspense and foreboding to create additional tension, while the macabre and often gruesome imagery repulses the reader’s senses. 

The story is quite well-developed and the writing is good, so this was an enjoyable short read. 

Book Review: ‘Creep’ by William Cook

Find your copy here.

This is an intensely suspenseful story that strikes dread into the heart of the reader right from the first moment of foreboding. As the tension and desperation of the story builds, so does the reader’s sense of hopelessness for the protagonist, whose innocence reinforces the positioning of readers against The Creep. 

The story is well-written and developed. The characterisation is effective and the detailed descriptions add depth and power to the the chilling effect of the story. 

While the story certainly has its macabre moments, the story is centred more on the psychology of fear and revulsion. The Creep is a very real and twisted monster in his own right, and the author subtly plays on the reader’s sensibilities to unsettle and repulse them.