Book Review: ‘The Curious Case of the Cursed Spectacles’ by Constance Barker

‘The Curious Case of the Cursed Spectacles‘ is a very entertaining cozy mystery read that keeps the reader guessing right until the end. It is the first book in Constance Barker’s Curiosity Shop Cozy Mysteries series. 

Populated by a seemingly mismatched but delightful cast of characters, the story is intriguing and suspenseful but also lightened by humour and some genuinely endearing moments. The premise of the story is original and, although fantastic, is made to be quite believable through the author’s talented writing and clever story development. 

This book definitely captures the reader’s imagination and provides a great escape from reality for a few enjoyable hours. 

Book Review: ‘Rub a Dub Dub’ by N.D. Burrows

This is a dark comedy novella for grownups that blends the mysterious with the everyday to create an unpredictable but very entertaining story. 

The characters are realistic and credible, and varied enough to make their interactions interesting. The story is well written,  with enough twists to keep it interesting without becoming unbelievable. 

 That it can be easily read in less than two hours makes it a great option for busy people who have to fit a good read into the demands of life.  

Book Review: ‘A Medium’s Birthday Surprise’ by Chariss K Walker

This is the first book in the Becky Tibbs: A North Carolina Medium Mystery Series, in which medium Becky Tibbs uses her paranormal abilities to help solve mysteries and help ghosts find peace. 

While skeptics might think that such blending of cozy mystery and paranormal investigation sounds contrived, Walker has created characters and storylines that seem realistic and eminently believable. A range of world views and perspectives are represented by different characters in the story, and the reader is respectfully left to draw their own conclusions. 

Regardless of one’s philosophy and world view, this is a really interesting and well-crafted mystery story. Becky’s path to solving the mystery is challenging and complex, and she must rely on investigation and logic to solve the problems she encounters along the way. 

The writing is good and the action and intrigue of the story builds well, right up to the end of the book. 

This is a series I would like to read more of. 

Audiobook Review: The Gold Dragon Caper. A Damien Dickens Mystery by Phyllis Entis

‘The Gold Dragon Caper’ is a the fourth of the Damien Dickens mystery  novel/audiobook series. 

The story is complex and full of intriguing twists, and progresses at a pace that keeps the reader hooked without feeling rushed.  A number of the characters from previous books in the series return in this story, giving a pleasing sense of continuity and connection for those who have read or listened to them, but there are also enough new characters to keep things fresh and interesting. 

The book does stand alone for readers who have not read the previous installments, but will deliver spoilers for anyone who might want to read the earlier books. 

The narration by Tom Lennon is very easy to listen to, and very much suits the detective noir style and tone of the story.

Book Review: ‘The Spyglass File’ by Nathan Dylan Goodwin

This is the fourth full length novel featuring Morton Farrier, forensic genealogist. The books in this series all explore an historical mystery while Morton also researches his own genealogical background. 

This is an intriguing story, extremely well told. 

A captivating blend of WWII intrigue, family secrets and investigative mystery fiction, this is yet another riveting instalment in a most excellent series. 

Book Review: ‘The Marquesa’s Necklace’ by P.J. MacLayne

Find your copy here.

What a treat it is to find a mystery that is interesting, unpredictable and highly original. 

The writing is good, the characters and scenarios are believable, and there are plenty of suspects and reflection herrings to sort through. 

As the central character, Harmony Dupree is refreshing in her normality and average appearance, using her brains and ingenuity to solve her problems and find solutions to the challenges she encounters. 

This is an interesting and engaging story that, once started, is hard to put down and really keeps the reader guessing.

Book Review: ‘Cookies and Scream’ by CeeCee James

Find your copy here.

‘Cookies and Scream’ is the second book in the Baker Street Cozy Mysteries Series by  CeeCee James, which features amateur sleuth Georgie Tanner, her Aunt Cecelia and the fictional historical town of Gainesville, Virginia. 

A visit to a local historical re-enactment places Georgie at the heart of a murder mystery that has many roots in both local history and her own past. What ensues is an intriguing and often dangerous chain of events that nudge Georgie closer to the truth. 

The story is well-written and the mystery is challenging and interesting. This is shaping up to be a series I am keen to follow. 

Book Review: ‘Larkin’s Landing’ by S.K. Wee

Small towns often seem quiet, as though nothing interesting would ever happen there. 

Larkin’s Landing is not that kind of small town. Full of old secrets and strong prejudice, it’s a community that is bursting at the seams with lies, deceit and mystery. 

This excellent blend of contemporary mystery and family drama keeps the reader guessing right to the end. The central characters are likeable, regular people who find themselves in the middle of a web of intrigue that they must undo before it undoes them. The story is well developed and suspenseful, taking the reader on a rollercoaster ride of anticipation and discovery as the mysteries of Larkin’s Landing unfold.    

There are elements of the story that some readers will find very confronting. It is a story that exposes the horrors of domestic violence and emotional abuse, and demonstrates very clearly that nobody should ever tolerate or excuse such reprehensible behaviour. There is also some adult content, so this book is not recommended for younger readers.

It is, though, a story of the importance of resilience, the healing power of acceptance, and the life-changing difference that true friendship makes. Overall, the story delivers a positive message and a satisfying sense of justice having been done.

New Release: ‘Being a P.I. — Again” by Alan Zacher

This new mystery suspense story from author Alan Zacher is out now!

Tom Mayor is a man in his mid-fifties who had done nothing with his life. Never had a steady job living off his parents, and he was a closet drunk. Then, as a joke, he told his mother that he had “the stuff” to be a private detective, like the “Thin Man”.
With the help of his mother, he gets his first case, and after some difficulties, he solves the murder of the next-door neighbor’s granddaughter. The case made him famous—and rich! The father of the murder victim gives him a million dollars. Life, for the first time in his miserable life, is good for Tom.
But now, someone is trying to kill him. Who? Why? To find out, Tom must become a P. I.— Again!

Alan Zacher turned to writing after many years of being a “struggling” actor in LA. He has had two novels published: “I’m No P. I.” and “A Ghoulish Good Time.” Having had MS for serval years now, he knows physical and mental pain and looks to laughter to endure it. He hopes that his novels do just that–give much laughter.

Audiobook Review: ‘The Asylum’ by Nathan Dylan Goodwin

This novella-length story serves as a prequel to Goodwin’s The Forensic Genealogist historical mystery series featuring Morton Farrier, using an intriguing research case to frame the beginning of Morton’s relationship with Juliet. 

Morton’s investigation takes him back to 1924 and the death of a young woman in an asylum. The results of his research are completely unexpected, in more ways than one. 

The story is well-constructed and highly  engaging, with some really nicely crafted creepy moments and great twists to keep the reader guessing. 

The narration is clear, well-paced and most enjoyable to listen to. The audiobook runs for a little over 2 hours, a great length to for well into a quiet afternoon, a drive or a longer commute.