Book Review: ‘With A Twist Of The Nib’ by Karen J Carlisle

This book offers a compilation of original flash fiction and short stories in different genres, each with a twist at the end. The stories are all imaginative and clever, and varied enough for the collection to remain interesting throughout. 

This would be a good collection for people who struggle to find time to commit to a longer story or full novel, as they can be read and enjoyed in a coffee break or when brief opportunities present themselves.

Book Review: ‘The Quarantine Fence’ by Roma Gray

This is a short, macabre story that unsettles rather than horrifies the reader. It raises questions about the values of society as a whole and of different groups of people within it.

The story is quite well written and developed, building tension as the narrative progresses. It is an enjoyable enough read, although one which most readers will not really find scary.

Overall, it’s a decent story, with some good macabre moments.

Book Review: ‘Black Vials’ by S.K. Gregory

Find your copy here.

It’s common knowledge that taking drugs isn’t good for you — and you should never take something if you don’t know what it is. 

This chilling tale reinforces that premise in a very powerful and graphic way. The portrayal of seedy drug dealers and drug use may seem stereotypical to some but is probably quite accurate and certainly feels realistic to the reader. 

Camille’s experiences when she swallows what is in the black vial are shocking on both a physical and a psychological level. The author combines the horror of the unknown with a very cleverly constructed sense of dread to position the reader to fear for Camille and anticipate possible outcomes that may await her. 

At times grungy, at other times macabre, this a short but  effective dark suspense story. 

Book Review: ‘Dobson Drive’ by Dale Robertson

Fear is often irrational… but sometimes, it’s not.  This is a good, suspenseful short story about one of those times when someone would have been right to pay heed to their fears. 

The story works really well because the characters and setting are so normal and relatable, which reminds the reader that this scenario could just as easily happen to them. 

The writing is good and the development of suspense and foreboding in the story is gradual and well-managed. 

‘Dobson Drive is a good story that can be read in about half an hour. It is ideally suited for readers of horror, paranormal and suspense. 

Book Review: ‘Last Call’ by Kaye Lynne Booth

This is an interesting and well-written story that can be read in under 30 minutes, making it ideal for busy people wanting a quick escape. The story neatly combines elements of mystery and suspense with a thought-provoking twist. 

The main character is relatable, as is his situation he finds himself. Empathy is induced by the first person narration and the exploration of his thoughts and responses, especially when he begins to question his own perceptions. When life offers him a refreshing change, the reader is challenged to consider what they would do in the same circumstances, giving them a vested interest in the outcome of the story. 

‘Last Call’ is a most enjoyable short story. 

‘The Baby on the Back Porch’ by Lucia N Davis

Sometimes people’s lives cross in uncanny ways. Whether it is by design, destiny or accident, these are events that can change the entire course of someone’s life.

‘The Baby on the Back Porch’ is a short story full of mystery, danger, and surprises. As the story progresses, the author makes really good use of foreboding and dream sequences to build tension and heighten the anticipation of the reader. The characters and premise of the story are believable and relatable, and while it starts off with the appearance of a story that might be romantic, it soon develops into something far more mysterious and compelling. 

This s a really well-crafted and enjoyable story that can comfortably be read in less than an hour and leaves the reader pondering the nature of coincidence and the ways in which one’s destiny might be interwoven with others’.

Book Review: ‘Bitter Prophecy’ by S. Tilghman Hawthorne

‘Bitter Prophecy’ is a short story full of mystery and adventure. It explores themes of good and evil, and of the ways in which temptation and obligation influence a person’s actions.

The story is well written, with an easy flow that makes it a very comfortable read. There are some really good moments of tension, and a couple of great twists that keep the reader engaged right to the end. 

It’s a very enjoyable short read that can be finished in about half an hour, so it fits well into a lunch break or at the end of a busy day. 

‘Bitter Prophecy’ has been awarded a Silver Acorn. 

Find your copy here.