Book Review: ‘Treed’ by Virginia Arthur

At the centre of this book is aa old oak tree and the fight to protect it from destruction, yet this is also a story of preservation of memories, friendships and relationships in a world where do much is treated as disposable.

The contrast between commercialIsm and sentimentality is powerful, framed in terms of the battle for the tree, but also brought into sharp focus in the character of Maybelline. She is the link between last and present, the catalyst for the events of the story, and the key figure– other than the tree– around whom this.story revolves.She is likeable, loyal, and has a fun approach to getting older without giving in to becoming elderly.

Maybelline finds herself surrounded by a cast of characters who, although she doesn’t know them well at the start of the story, show her that there is more than one way to become a family.

I really enjoyed this story, but I also value the message from the author: too many trees are cut down, too many forests are destroyed and too many lives are changed irreparably for the sake of greed for money and personal gain. Somewhere along the line, our culture has got its values very wrong.

This is a good read, delivering some valuable messages in a most positive way.

‘Treed’ has been awarded a Silver Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: First Floor On Fire by Michael Russell

This is a gritty, angry story, brilliantly told. 

I’ve given it five glowing stars. 

Michael Russell First Floor On Fire

This book is full of discord, anger and tension, experienced through immediate immersion in the life of the main character, Nevaya. The reader experiences her anger, her disadvantage, and the acid burn of prejudice and discrimination on her soul.

Russell’s portrayal of Nevaya is confronting, yet the reader cannot help but feel empathy with her, despite her cynicism and anger at the circumstances of her life. Her character is developed through her thoughts and responses far more than her words or behaviours, although those are as bold and defiant as her thoughts and attitudes. Her language is powerfully written in the gangland style of North Philadelphia – the writing is so sharp and cutting, one cannot avoid reading this book in Nevaya’s voice. The reader is strongly positioned to see her point of view and develop a strong sense of identification with her, despite her rough edges, and (in my own case) having no experience whatsoever of the kind of life she has lived.

The reader also gains insight into some of the reasons for the failure of schools and social authority structures to understand the motivations and actions of young African-American people, or to meet their needs in any real way: the cumulative effect of decades’ worth of disadvantage and segregation, even within their own communities, is too great to be overcome. Russell delivers this message powerfully through this fringe-of-gangland narrative.

The most uncomfortable part of this story for me, however, was not in the brutal violence or raw language. I found it incredibly difficult to stomach the actions and self-justification of those authority figures who should have been looking to protect and nurture the kids, but instead were only seeking to serve themselves. Had it not been for the perspectives of the two teachers who really did nurture their students and seek to improve their chances in life, the picture would be very bleak indeed.

This is a gritty, angry story, brilliantly told.

You can purchase this ebook at Amazon.

I’ve given it five glowing stars.

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