Book of the Week: ‘Reecah’s Flight’ by Richard H Stephens

Reecah’s Flight is Book 1 in the Legends of the Lurker fantasy series by Richard H Stephens. 

There’s something strange about the woman living on top of the hill and the people of Fishmonger Bay leave her alone. At least until the day she pays a visit to the village witch.

There’s something strange about the woman living on top of the hill and the people of Fishmonger Bay leave her alone. At least until the day she pays a visit to the village witch. Banding together, the villagers take action. One magic user is bad enough; the emergence of a second—intolerable. Her life spinning out of control, Reecah Draakvriend tries desperately to unravel the dark secret hanging over her head. In a never-ending battle to survive, she must decide whether it is wiser to slay the dragon or become a victim of her people. If Reecah can’t find the key to unlock her family heritage, will she fall prey to the mystery so many others have died to protect?

Banding together, the villagers take action. One magic user is bad enough; the emergence of a second—intolerable.

Her life spinning out of control, Reecah Draakvriend tries desperately to unravel the dark secret hanging over her head. In a never-ending battle to survive, she must decide whether it is wiser to slay the dragon or become a victim of her people.

If Reecah can’t find the key to unlock her family heritage, will she fall prey to the mystery so many others have died to protect?

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‘Build Your Tribe on Facebook as a Published Author’ by Slaven Vujic

Find your copy here.

Choosing to be an independent or self published author is both immensely satisfying and incredibly challenging. One of the biggest problems Indie authors face is getting their books seen and noticed by readers. 

This book is a short but enormously insightful guide designed to help Indie authors find their audience. As helpful as this little gem of a book is about what people can do to reach out to readers, it is equally enlightening about why some social media strategies simply don’t work. 

There is some excellent advice about how to both create and tailor groups and pages to suit particular audiences, and about making those things consistent with branding and style so that content is focused and recognisable to audiences. Above all, the book maintains a very positive and deliberate focus ion making content and interactions genuine and meaningful, and how that can be achieved. 

The writing is straightforward and easily understood, and the content of the book is organised into seven cohesive modules that each address one aspect or problem authors experience in the complex and often very muddy world of social media marketing. 

‘Build Your Tribe on Facebook’ is a no-nonsense guide to doing exactly that. Even though it is aimed at authors, it is a book that independent consultants, network sellers, Indie creatives and people involved in small business would benefit greatly from reading. 

Book Review: ‘Angels of Perdition’ Chaos of Souls Book 2′ by R. M. Garino

It is during times of significant trial that one experiences growth and development far beyond that achieved by luxury or effort. 

Themes of endurance and resilience and the survival of the fittest are  explored in depth in this sequel to ‘Gates of Golorath’. (link) ‘Angels of Perdition’ is a saga focused on Arielle and Angus, characters from the previous book who begin a new phase of their lives in this next instalment in the series. The cast of characters and the incredibly complex world established in the first book are continued in the second, but because they are already familiar to the reader, it feels as much like a reunion as it does a continuation. The banter and interactions between various characters are highly engaging and draws the reader deeper into the story as the action and drama build. 

The story is really well told and  expertly paced. The writing is infused with energy and rich imagery that really makes the scenes and characters come to life in the reader’s mind. The action scenes are well developed with excellent attention to detail. 

This is a captivating and quite inspiring read that holds definite appeal to readers of epic fantasy, particularly those who want to discover sophisticated worlds and complex societies with a rich history and a future to fight for.

Book Review: 'Dead by Morning' by Kayla Krantz

Teen peer pressure reaches terrifying new levels in this YA paranormal thriller, in which the protagonist Luna Ketz appears to be a most unlikely heroine: she’s not popular, she’s Muslim in a predominantly white community, and she hates Chance, the boy who is determined to get her attention. 

The tension between Luna and Chance continues to escalate as the story progresses and Luna finds herself caught in a web of conspiracy, secrecy and deceit. In a highly original blend of YA paranormal, mystery and horror, the gripping storyline is evidence of author’s ability to blend reality and fantasy in an intriguing way that engages the reader and causes them to invest emotionally in Luna’s fate.  

‘Dead By Morning’ is easy to read and hard to put down once started. 

Book Review: ‘The Hollow Crown’ by Jeff Wheeler

Find your copy here.

The fourth book in The Kingfountain Series, ‘The Hollow Crown’ is another wonderful foray into the kingdom of Ceredigion and the surrounding lands. 

This book changes the focus of the story from Owen Kiskaddon to his daughter, Tryneowy, and the reader is once again drawn into the intrigue and adventure of life among the noble families, wizrs, the fountain-blessed folk, and the villains who conspire against them. It is an exciting and enchanting tale in which the reader becomes deeply immersed. The storytelling is mesmerising and the settings and scenery are richly and vividly drawn. 

Tryneowy’s story is both compelling and interesting. As she grows up, she becomes a young woman of strength and determination, guided by her ethics and loyal to her loved ones and the oaths she makes. She is a character that young women can admire, speaking up for equality in an era where women were not able to do all that men could, and showing that people should be valued for their integrity and abilities regardless of gender. 

Readers who have not read the previous books in this series will find this to be a complete story on its own, and thoroughly enjoyable as such. 

There is, however, a profound sense of being part of something much bigger—an overarching, ‘big picture’ narrative — and evening a sense of belonging that the reader develops throughout this most excellent series. This is the magic and allure of Wheeler’s writing and the world he has created with Kingfountain and the Kiskaddons at its centre. 

Short Story Review: ‘Good Intentions’ by D.J.Doyle

Find your copy here.

Readers of horror who want a top quality short read will be well pleased by this dark and twisted short story, which can easily be enjoyed during a coffee or lunch break. 

Doyle’s writing is always easy to read and her characters realistic and relatable. That dreadful things can happen to ordinary people is an underlying premise that enables a great horror story to evoke shock and fear in its readers, who are invariably aware of the fact that such things could happen to anyone. When the story takes an unexpected turn, it heightens the anticipation of what is to come and the fear of the unknown. 

It is in these elements of the story that Doyle successfully manages to immerse her readers in a situation, turn it around, and leave them gasping, all within the space of just a few minutes. 

Book Review: ‘The Day I Saw The Hummingbird’ by Paulette Mahurin

This book held definite appeal to me as I have long admired the work of Harriet Tubman and all those who worked to liberate slaves and help them to freedom. ‘The Day I Saw The Hummingbird’ immerses the reader in the life and experiences of Oscar Mercer, born into slavery in a sugar plantation in Louisiana in the years preceding the American Civil War. 

Oscar’s story is heartbreaking, terrifying and inspiring as the author positions the reader as an eyewitness to the tragedies, but also the courage and kindness, experienced by Oscar as he grows to understand that compassion is as powerful as hatred, and that wisdom and loyalty are qualities that should be as highly prized as one’s own freedom.

This story is beautifully told, with evocative language and vivid imagery that causes the reader to develop deep empathy not only for Oscar but also for all others in similar positions. The story also highlights a truth that is often overlooked: even in the deep south, there were many white people opposed to slavery or, at the very least, opposed to the cruelty with which so many were treated. Indeed, a broad range of human responses to slavery are depicted in the actions of different characters in this book, showing that it is one’s individual choices and personal ethics that set one person apart from another in terms of character and integrity, and that it is both possible and imperative to stand up for what is right rather than settle for convenient wrongs.

This is an important story that everyone should read in their lifetime, and which should be in personal bookshelves and library collections alongside ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ and ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’.